A Review of SUMMER SOLSTICE by Nina MacLaughlin

A Review of SUMMER SOLSTICE by Nina MacLaughlin

“What’s the start of summer for you, the signal that it’s here?” Nina MacLaughlin asks in her book-length essay Summer Solstice, published by Black Sparrow Press. And with that invitation the reader’s imagination is kindled, fueled by the flush of inquiries that follow: “Is it the last day of school? The lilacs or the day lilies? First sleep with the windows open?”

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The Social Virtues Series

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Recent Posts

Our Chernobyl

Our Chernobyl

From my window, I look out at Montpelier’s empty streets, trying to tune out the COVID-19 news updates that ping and bing on my phone, asking myself why this all feels so eerily familiar. I know this jumble of emotions. Fear, helplessness, despair, and also the sense that we’re all in this together.

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Green Mountains Review, based at Northern Vermont University, is an annual, award-winning literary magazine publishing poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, literary essays, interviews, and book reviews by both well-known writers and promising newcomers.

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Piano

Piano

MIKE WHITE is the author of How to Make a Bird with Two Hands (Word Works), which was awarded the 2011 Washington Prize.

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Two Poems

Two Poems

SUE D. BURTON’s poetry has previously appeared in Green Mountains Review and in Beloit Poetry Journal, Hayden’s Ferry Review, New Ohio Review, Shenandoah, and on Verse Daily.

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Bazaar

Bazaar

PAUL CARROLL, a former professional ballet dancer, works as an attorney bringing environmental lawsuits in northern California on behalf of public interest groups, and handling criminal appeals for the indigent.

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Belongings

Belongings

The daughter’s wind chimes have been stolen. Someone swiped the singing things right off the cobwebbed porch. But more, too: her dusty rolling pin she bakes pies for her mother with, chef’s knife she rocks over garden-grown herbs, Guatemalan painting, Danish desk—all gone.

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The Migration of Kiruna

The Migration of Kiruna

The new town had nearly the same blueprint but was more trim and better thought-out. . . . . Once a replica was finished in the new town, its original was demolished without ceremony. The streets were slowly tilled into dust and brisk wind.

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