The Monkey and the Girl

The Monkey and the Girl

Winnie’s 350-square foot studio that she called home resembled a submarine, she liked to say to strangers, to offer them a quick image of what it was like to live in small spaces. A submarine was dark and hollow, challenged by gravity. Her apartment was on the top floor of a walk-up tenement building in downtown Manhattan, and got afternoon light. But at night she could squint and conjure the resemblance. Not that she’d ever set foot inside of a submarine.

read more

The Social Distance Reading Series

GMR
 

Recent Posts

A Review of  J.G. McClure’s The Fire Lit & Nearing

A Review of J.G. McClure’s The Fire Lit & Nearing

The image evoked by the title, The Fire Lit & Nearing (Indolent Press, 2018) is both micro (a match flame inching towards your fingers), and macro (a forest fire jumping the fireline). It also summons the spark that lights up when we are about to fall in love. You know you can’t stop it; you know it will damage you; and there’s not a thing you can do about it. Like folks who rebuild on fire-prone land, this is not the first time you have been burnt and won’t be the last. So why? Perhaps it is so we can make art of it.

read more
Skin Ghazal: An Essay

Skin Ghazal: An Essay

It is believed that the arrow that caused Ötzi the Iceman to bleed out on a mountain in the Alps had been used to kill two other people, probably by Ötzi himself since there’s murderous evidence on his knife as well, and I’m sure there’s a moral here or a handy metaphor, but what really fascinates me are his 61 tattoos. CT scans have shown he must have suffered physical pain, and the black line tattoos were an early form of acupuncture and meant to treat his ailments, ashes of old fires turned to ink that could draw his pain to the surface of his skin.

read more
Crossing Over

Crossing Over

Not long ago, I wrote an essay reflecting on the many forms delusions can take that included some snippets from my childhood that I’d more or less suppressed for years. When I shared the essay with some other writers, I knew they would tell me that it was great. That I was great. But they didn’t. Nearly all of them wrote in the margin by the passage about my father, “this isn’t enough, go deeper.” I knew it wasn’t enough, hence the suppressing. But their pointing it out meant I had to do something about it or bury it for good.

read more

How do you want to read GMR?

Take our fun survey!
 
How much does it cost?How much does it pay?
Green Mountains Review, based at Northern Vermont University, is an annual, award-winning literary magazine publishing poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, literary essays, interviews, and book reviews by both well-known writers and promising newcomers.

6 + 13 =

Why Write #4: Norman Lock

      "In truth?  In truth, Lock writes it, Lish reads it!--which is a damn sight more than Lish will say for Proust."  So says Gordon Lish of this installment's guest blogger, the amphibious Norman Lock--endlessly innovative yet stylistically as...

read more

New Issue Almost Here!

  Our 2011 winter issue ran a little late this year, but the wait's been worth it.  Weighing in at nearly 300 pages, Volume 24, no. 2 of GMR features poetry by Todd Boss, Olena Kalytiak Davis, Stephen Dunn, Bob Hicok, Major Jackson, Carl Phillips, Katherine...

read more
Why Write? #3:  Ben Aleshire

Why Write? #3: Ben Aleshire

        Our third installment of our Why Write? guest blogger series brings us Ben Aleshire, who typed up the below and mailed it to us from France.  One cannot emphasize enough the pleasure of receiving a typed note from France, the letters...

read more
Why Write? #2:  Stephen Dunn

Why Write? #2: Stephen Dunn

Welcome to the second installment in our "Why Write?" guest blogger series, in which GMR contributors very generously attempt to unravel for us why they do what they do.  Daryl Scroggins kicked off the series last month, and we're pleased now to present poet Stephen...

read more
Why Write? #1:  Daryl Scroggins

Why Write? #1: Daryl Scroggins

Welcome to our new guest blogger series "Why Write?," in which we harry some of GMR's contributors with that old question -- damnably obtuse, damnably pointed -- Why do you write? Future guest bloggers will include Stephen Dunn, Norman Lock, Tony Magistrale, Laird...

read more

Want to Submit Your Work?