The World Already on Fire: Dzvinia Orlowsky’s Bad Harvest

The World Already on Fire: Dzvinia Orlowsky’s Bad Harvest

Bad Harvest is a resonant folk song that fills the chambers of the future with echoes of the past. Its complex twists of hereditary and personal relations with language and work open a chasm of concern for the future that Dzvinia Orlowsky locates and does a little dance on the edge of. She stares openly, even mockingly, into the pit of impermanence and unpredictability, spinning the prescribed doom and mortality of what we all know shall end: health, love, and livelihood.

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The Social Distance Reading Series

GMR
 

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Two Poems

Two Poems

One can hold a crossbow and a pussy / Willow with the same affection. / One can dream her own body in the arms / of the blue Mary

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No One Should Feel That Alone

No One Should Feel That Alone

Jane was handing someone a bouquet of satay, / gushing about Muller’s Foreign Cinema and Laszlo, / when I told her about the abortion. A party / not the best place to breathe new disclosures, to say: / The baby would be three years old now.

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Homecoming

Homecoming

Finally the war was over / we could go home but / wife was wary. Those houses? / said, watching the news. / >Those stores? schools? police? Fake. / believe what you see.

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Green Mountains Review, based at Northern Vermont University, is an annual, award-winning literary magazine publishing poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, literary essays, interviews, and book reviews by both well-known writers and promising newcomers.

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Review of The Biology of Luck by Jacob M. Appel

Review of The Biology of Luck by Jacob M. Appel

What ties these people and their lives together is that, as in Joyce’s Ulysses, the entire story takes place in the course of a single day–a Wednesday in summer–and all within a single city–New York. Our Mr. Bloom, however, isn’t a Leopold but a Larry, who works as a tour guide and who, on this particular day, is leading a group of Dutch tourists through the city their ancestors colonized some four centuries before.

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American Jewish Women Poets: Part I

American Jewish Women Poets: Part I

What is a Jewish poem? This question has been on my mind since I began writing poetry in high school. If I write poems about Jewish holidays and Israel, are they Jewish poems? If I write a poem that includes a few Hebrew or Yiddish words, is the poem Jewish? If the poet is Jewish, is the poem automatically Jewish as well?

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DUZ Does Everything

DUZ Does Everything

ALEXANDRA TEAGUE is the author of Mortal Geography (Persea 2010), winner of the 2009 Lexi Rudnitsky Prize and 2010 California Book Award, and The Wise and Foolish Builders (Persea 2015).

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Restoring the Confederacy Theater

Restoring the Confederacy Theater

Dad’s a manwhore. On his first date with Mom, he made her watch a bunch of filthy Betamax tapes with him. She let him. Dad was a banker from a good family. Mom’s dad set the date up. And on rolled the Betamax. Because this was the seventies, I like to picture this all going down in sepia: Mom fluffing her hair, applying lipstick, Dad listening to Supertramp and doing coke out of the filter end of a Parliament in his Lincoln, Mom screeching at the sight of John Holmes’s monster member.

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No Good for Digging

No Good for Digging

A plumber died in the trenches. The red earth caved, made a sucking sound as the cold clay swallowed his knees and then the topsoil cascaded in a sigh. In that first second of his boots sinking, he thought about wet socks.

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