Born Naked

Born Naked

The first time I met my husband, he was wearing a single-breasted, peacock-blue suit made of silk. In the khaki and navy blazer culture that was Washington, D.C. at the time, Mario stood out. With his continental name, olive skin, and sartorial flair, many assumed he was Italian. That people were surprised to discover he was Mexican said less about him than it did about their preconceptions, some of which I shared. This was before I’d moved to Mexico, before I’d read The Labyrinth of Solitude, in which Octavio Paz says of the zoot-suit wearing pachuco: His disguise is a protection, but it also differentiates and isolates him: it both hides him and points him out. read more
GMR

Recent Posts

Review of LOST AND FOUND by Andrew Merton

In October of 2013 I received an email from Andrew Merton—a journalist, essayist, poet and professor Emeritus of English at the University of Hampshire. Although he and I were not acquainted, he’d stumbled across one of my poems and reached out to tell me he was intrigued. “I think you may feel a small shock of recognition when you read my own poem, "'Snow,'" he wrote... read more

How do you want to read GMR?

Take our fun survey! How much does it cost?How much does it pay?
Green Mountains Review, based at Johnson State College in Vermont, is a biannual, award-winning literary magazine publishing poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, literary essays, interviews, and book reviews by both well-known writers and promising newcomers.

14 + 10 =

The Prince

The Prince

NATALIE MESNARD currently teaches writing at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her fiction has appeared in Copper Nickel and Kenyon Review Online. She was also named a winner in the 2014 AWP Intro Journals Project, for which her poetry will appear in a future issue of Tampa Review. read more
Home

Home

The living room was small and immaculately clean. From my place on the carpet, I could see a few tiny crumbs from the crackers I had eaten earlier, but that was because Mommy hadn’t done today’s vacuuming yet. read more
Origin

Origin

JULIA KOLCHINSKY DASBACH emigrated as a Jewish refugee from Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine in 1993. She holds an MFA in Poetry from the University of Oregon and is in the University of Pennsylvania’s Comparative Literature Ph.D. program. Julia’s poetry has appeared in Tupelo Quarterly, Guernica, and Nashville Review, among others journals. Her manuscript, The Bear Who Ate the Stars, won of Split Lip Magazine's Uppercut Chapbook Award, and is forthcoming from Split Lip Press this fall. She was most recently runner-up in Southern Humanities Review’s 2014 Auburn Witness Poetry Prize. Julia is also the Editor-in-Chief of Construction Magazine. Find out more by visiting her website. read more
Lifeline

Lifeline

You. Are old. Admit it. Evidence abounds. Your cell phone, for example. Fat. Red. Trills a jaunty greeting. Young people snicker. You, more often than not, fail to recognize the sound. read more
How I See the Humans

How I See the Humans

Gretchen VanWormer grew up in Burlington, Vermont. The essay above will be included in her forthcoming chapbook, How I See The Humans, published by CutBank Books. Other essays and stories have appeared or are forthcoming in Brevity, The Pinch, DIAGRAM, The Laurel Review, The Los Angeles Review, Zone 3, The Collagist, and PANK. She lives in Washington, DC, and teaches writing at American University. read more
Page 29 of 65« First...1020...2728293031...405060...Last »

Want to Submit Your Work?

Click Here